Comments on: The impossibility of a screen-free life /2012/01/04/the-impossibility-of-a-screen-free-life/ Identity, society and work in the age of perpetual connectivity Thu, 21 Feb 2013 22:21:04 +0000 hourly 1 By: Sophy Bot /2012/01/04/the-impossibility-of-a-screen-free-life/#comment-59 Sophy Bot Thu, 23 Feb 2012 16:39:45 +0000 /?p=488#comment-59 DH, what you're talking about is the digital divide (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_divide) and you're absolutely right that there are many out there who either cannot afford to get online or actively choose not to participate. However, living in a modern, internet-reliant society where the majority of people around you are connected 24/7, I do stand by the fact that it is functionally impossible to be a full-fledged member of said society while shunning technologies altogether. Those that you refer to living at the level of subsistence tend to do so away from the ubiquity of technology, in rural areas where the need for technology is comparatively minor. But no modern urbanite (and that does constitute the majority of humanity now - http://www.unfpa.org/pds/urbanization.htm) existing above the poverty level can fully abstain without experiencing some negative impact on their life. Modern jobs require high levels of technological proficiency, and the bar is being raised with every year. Staying unplugged or "not owning a computer in the first place" (90% of Americans own computerized devices by the way - http://articles.cnn.com/2011-02-03/tech/texting.photos.gahran_1_cell-phone-landline-tech-gadget?_s=PM:TECH) directly affects most people's ability to find gainful employment. As such, I'd hardly consider it an "artificial dilemma." Thanks for your internet-connected blog comment, though. DH, what you’re talking about is the digital divide (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_divide) and you’re absolutely right that there are many out there who either cannot afford to get online or actively choose not to participate. However, living in a modern, internet-reliant society where the majority of people around you are connected 24/7, I do stand by the fact that it is functionally impossible to be a full-fledged member of said society while shunning technologies altogether. Those that you refer to living at the level of subsistence tend to do so away from the ubiquity of technology, in rural areas where the need for technology is comparatively minor. But no modern urbanite (and that does constitute the majority of humanity now – http://www.unfpa.org/pds/urbanization.htm) existing above the poverty level can fully abstain without experiencing some negative impact on their life. Modern jobs require high levels of technological proficiency, and the bar is being raised with every year. Staying unplugged or “not owning a computer in the first place” (90% of Americans own computerized devices by the way – http://articles.cnn.com/2011-02-03/tech/texting.photos.gahran_1_cell-phone-landline-tech-gadget?_s=PM:TECH) directly affects most people’s ability to find gainful employment. As such, I’d hardly consider it an “artificial dilemma.” Thanks for your internet-connected blog comment, though.

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By: DH /2012/01/04/the-impossibility-of-a-screen-free-life/#comment-56 DH Thu, 23 Feb 2012 09:06:16 +0000 /?p=488#comment-56 It's not impossible. Most people in the world live at the level of subsistence, and will never own a computer in the first place. So your artificial dilemma is never going to be a concern to them. It’s not impossible. Most people in the world live at the level of subsistence, and will never own a computer in the first place. So your artificial dilemma is never going to be a concern to them.

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